Navigating Import/Export Regulations in Brazil

If you’re considering expanding your business to the largest economy in Latin America, understanding Brazil’s import and export regulations is critical. This article provides an overview of the key import/export regulations in Brazil to help you navigate the complexities of trade in this thriving market.

Brazil has stringent import regulations to protect its industries. Here are some key aspects to consider:

Product Classification: All imported goods must be classified under the Nomenclature Comum do Mercosul (NCM), which is based on the global Harmonized System. The NCM code will determine the import duties and taxes and whether the goods need to adhere to specific customs regimes.

Import License: Certain goods, such as medical devices, cosmetics, electronics, food, and agriculture-related products, require an Import License issued by the relevant authorities, including ANVISA, DECEX, IBAMA, INMETRO, and MAPA.

RADAR System: Import operations in Brazil must be registered under the Registro e Rastreamento da Atuação dos Intervenientes Aduaneiros (RADAR) system. Only Brazilian companies can obtain a RADAR import permit.

Exporting goods from Brazil also requires adherence to specific regulations:

Product Classification: Similar to imports, exports also need to be classified under the NCM code, which will determine if the goods are subject to export controls.

RADAR System: Export operations in Brazil must be registered under the Registro e Rastreamento da Atuação dos Intervenientes Aduaneiros (RADAR) system. Only Brazilian companies can obtain a RADAR import permit.

RE (Registro de Exportação): Before exporting, a company must register the goods in the Export Registry (RE) system.

Proof of Export: Once the goods have been exported, the company must provide a Proof of Export to the Brazilian tax authorities to avoid paying sales tax (ICMS) on the goods exported.

Customs and Duties

All goods imported into Brazil are subject to customs duty and taxes, including the Import Duty (II), Industrialized Product tax (IPI), PIS/PASEP, COFINS, and ICMS. The rates vary based on the NCM classification of the product.

Conclusion

Understanding and complying with Brazil’s import/export regulations are essential to ensuring a smooth and profitable operation. Given the complexities of Brazilian trade regulations, businesses often benefit from partnering with local trade experts like Novatrade, who offer in-depth knowledge and assistance in navigating these regulatory hurdles.

Remember, while this article provides a general overview, it is not exhaustive. Consult a trade specialist or legal advisor for advice tailored to your specific business and products.

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